Business Visa For Ireland

A visa to work in Ireland, also known as a D-1 business visa or D-1 creative and digital entrepreneur visa, is a permit issued by the Irish Embassy to people who wish to come to Ireland and work for an employer here. Business visas are only available to EEA citizens, which include all EU member states plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. The basic eligibility requirements for a business visa are that you have been offered a job in Ireland by an eligible business sponsor, that you have enough financial resources to live on while here, and that you have health insurance in place.

Applying for a visa for Ireland can be a difficult process. It is essential to ensure that your application is as full and complete as possible in order to avoid any delays. It is important to carefully plan everything in advance so you can avoid the last minute rush. The majority of people who fail to get their visa are caught out because they don’t have sufficient time or they are unsure of what their requirements are.

Introduction

A short stay business visa allows you to travel to Ireland for up to 90 days for business purposes or for work that lasts 14 days or less, subject to conditions described below.

All short stay visas are also called ‘C’ visas.

About this visa

short stay ‘C’ business visa allows you to travel to Ireland for up to 90 days for activities related to your job, including to:

  • Attend meetings
  • Negotiate or sign agreements or contracts
  • Work for 14 days or less.

This visa does not allow you to:

  • Work in any way (paid or unpaid) for 15 days or longer
  • Rely on Irish public services, for example public hospitals.

Rules for working 14 days or less

You should apply for a business visa if your work in Ireland starts and ends within a single 14 day period (2 calendar weeks).

Your work must start and end within a single 14 day period

For example, if you plan to work in Ireland for 7 days, then stop working for 10 days (while remaining in Ireland) and then work again for 7 days, your work will not start and end within a single 14 day period (2 calendar weeks).

In this example, you must apply for permission to work through the Atypical Working Scheme and if you are successful you then apply for a short stay employment visa.

You cannot work more than once during the 90 day period

For example, if you are granted a multiple entry visa you may plan to work in Ireland for 14 consecutive days, then leave Ireland for 1 month and return again to work for another 14 days.

In this example, you are working more than once for 14 days or less within 90 days. This is not permitted so you must apply for permission to work through the Atypical Working Scheme and (if successful) apply for a short stay employment visa.

Important: A visa allows you to travel to Ireland only. It does not give you permission to enter the country or to stay here. An immigration officer at border control can refuse you entry even if you have a visa.

Who needs to apply?

You need a visa to come to Ireland if you travel using a passport issued by a country that is visa required or using a convention travel document issued by certain countries. Each traveller must apply for a separate visa.

A visa application for a young person (aged under 18) should be made by their parent or legal guardian. Extra conditions for young people also apply. You should not purchase travel tickets before you receive a decision on your visa application.

How to apply

You must apply for a visa from your home country, or a country where you are a legal resident. Prepare your application 3 months before you travel.

Your application has 3 parts:

  • (1) Create a visa application online
  • (2) Pay the visa application fee
  • (3) Send your passport and other documents for processing.

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