Norway Student Visa With Spouse

Norwegian citizens and Nordic citizens with unlimited residence permits in a Schengen country can apply for a residence permit in Norway without providing any financial guarantee. Other foreign nationals who are not Nordic citizens or Norwegian citizens are required to provide financial guarantees when applying for a residence permit in Norway. This can be accomplished by applying for a new credit card, which has been guaranteed by an individual Norwegian resident. The Norwegian resident will also be responsible for covering the expenses if you end up staying longer than permitted under your visa conditions.

Applying for a student visa as a family can get tricky. It requires you to submit various paperwork, in addition to the documents needed by a single applicant. You also need to prove that your family would be able to support itself financially during your stay in Norway. Here we will explore the process of applying for a student visa with spouse. We will base our discussion today on – Norway Student Visa With Spouse. But, other resources which you can find on our website include some frequently asked questions such as: norway spouse visa requirements and norway student visa processing time

The Norway study visa program is one of the most exclusive student visa programs in Europe. Students with foreign spouse are required to apply for Norway Study Visa with their Spouse. It is an important aspect because if you have a Norwegian spouse, you can easily get your study permit as well as your work permit after studying for 9 months in Norway.

In case you are moving to Norway with a spouse, there is one special thing you have to take care of before applying for Norway student visa. The special condition is that your spouse should not have a temporary residence permit in Norway. If your spouse has got a residence permit in Norway, then it may cause problem while pursuing education in the country.

Norway Student Visa With Spouse

Are you planning to live in Norway with your spouse? Here’s what you need to know about study visa requirements for Norway when you have a spouse. Is it possible to live in Norway on a study visa with a spouse? When you are married or in any other partnership/relationship or in a same-sex marriage, one of the visa options available is via applying for family immigration under the family immigration scheme. This scheme allows immigrants who are not Norwegian citizens to move to Norway and have them apply for residence permits. As a family member of an immigrant, you can also be granted a residence permit. Once this has been achieved, you may then look at how staying on beyond just family unification might proceed. For instance, spouses who hold residency visas will be able to start looking for work permits and you may want to explore further education opportunities.

To live and work in Norway, you will have to apply for a Norway Work Visa.

The most common type of Norwegian Work Visa is the Skilled Worker Visa, which is issued to someone who has found a job for a Norwegian employer and has a university degree or vocational training.

Although it is called a Work “Visa”, what you are actually applying for is a Norwegian Residence Permit for Work, which allows you to live and work in Norway legally.

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Who Can Apply for a Norway Work Visa?

You can apply for a Norwegian Work Visa if you fulfil the following requirements:

  • You have one of these qualifications:
    • You have completed higher education
    • You have completed a vocational education
    • You have “special qualifications” which make you eligible for the job, even if you lack proper education.
  • You have found a job with an employer in Norway.
  • The job is full time.
  • The job does not pay less than it would pay a Norwegian citizen.
  • You are over the age of 18.
  • You do not have a criminal background.

Norway Work Visa Requirements

The documents you need to hand in when you apply for a Norway Work Visa are:

  • Your passport. Also, send in copies of all the used pages on your passport.
  • The Norway Work Visa Application Form. You will receive this in PDF format after you complete the online application on the UDI website. Print it out and attach it to the rest of the documents.
  • Two passport size photographs. They must be recently taken and with a white background.
  • Proof you have accommodation in Norway. For example, a written rental contract. If you have not made accommodation arrangements yet, write a letter explaining where you plan to live and how you will find housing.
  • The Offer of Employment Form. Your employer must fill this out. The form is available on the UDI website.
  • Proof that your salary meets the income requirements. g. your employment contract, stating the salary you will receive.
  • Proof of your academic qualifications. For example, your university or vocational training diploma.
  • Proof of previous employment experience. Documents from your previous employers, which detail the type of work you did, how long you were employed, and your qualifications.
  • Your resume/CV.
  • If you live somewhere other than your home country: Proof you are there legally and have held a residence permit for the past six months.
  • If you submit your application in Norway: Proof you live in Norway legally.
  • If your employer will apply on your behalf: The Power of Attorney Form, downloadable from the UDI website.
  • Any additional documents, as required by your specific situation, such as explanation regarding:
    • If you will work for more than one employer
    • If you do not have a continuous employment contract
  • The checklist of documents you need, downloadable from the UDI.

Document guidelines:

  • The documents you submit have to be in original form as well as copies.
  • If your employer applies on your behalf, the documents may be simply copies.
  • If the documents are not in English or Norwegian, you must translate them by a qualified translator.
  • The Embassy may ask for additional documents, depending on your specific situation.
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How to Apply for a Norway Work Visa?

Once you have a job offer in Norway, you will have to start the application for a Work Visa online at the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI). Then, you can either:

  • Hand in the completed application along with the documents yourself at the Embassy or a Visa Application Center.
  • Hand in the documents in Norway, if you are already there.
  • Send the documents to your employer who applies on your behalf from Norway.

If you apply for a Norway Work Visa yourself (from your home country)

If you are still in your home country when you apply for a Norway visa, you have to:

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  • Gather the necessary documents for a work visa application.
  • Complete the online application on the UDI website
  • Hand in the completed application to the nearest Norwegian Embassy or Visa Application Center.
  • The Embassy/VAC will forward your application to the UDI in Norway

If you typically need a visa to enter Norway, then the UDI will send the entry visa to the Embassy or VAC where you submitted your application. You can use this visa to enter Norway and work. You do not need to apply for an entry visa as well.

If you are typically exempt from a Norway Visa, then you can just enter the country within the deadline. No other actions are required.

If you apply for a Norway Work Visa yourself (in Norway)

If you are already in Norway when you submit your Work Visa application, then you must:

  • Gather the necessary documents for a Work Visa application.
  • Complete the online application on the UDI website
  • Hand in the completed application to the Residence Permit and Protection Services of the Norwegian police or to a Service Centre for Foreign Workers (SUA), depending on which Norwegian district you are in.
  • The police or SUA will forward the application to the UDI.

You may also apply for a Norwegian entry visa, which is short-term and does not allow you to work – it only allows you to go to Norway to hand in your application. After the UDI processes the Work Visa, then you may start to work.

If your employer applies for the Norway Work Visa on your behalf

If your employer applies for your Norwegian Work Visa, the process is:

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  • You gather the required documents for a Norway Work Visa.
  • Complete the online application on the UDI website.
  • You send copies of the required documents to your employer along with a written authorisation for them to apply on your behalf.
  • Your employer hands in the completed application to the Residence Permit and Protection Services of the Norwegian police or to a Service Centre for Foreign Workers (SUA), depending on which Norwegian district they are in.
  • The police or SUA will forward the application to the UDI.

Remember:

  • Once you decide to apply for a Norwegian Work Visa, your first step should be to visit the UDI website, where you have to complete the online application. The process is streamlined and adapted to your specific situation, taking into account your academic background, your nationality and which way you would like to apply: yourself or through your employer.
  • After you arrive in Norway, you have to go to the local police services and get your Residence Card. You must make the appointment before you leave, using the UDI Application Portal, and it should ideally be for within the first week of your arrival.

Processing Time for a Norway Work Visa

Once you hand in your Work Visa application, it can take up to 8 weeks for the application to be processed. If you are already in Norway during this time, you are not allowed to start work until the visa has been approved.

Norway Work Visa Fee

The fee for a Norway Work Visa is NOK 6,300 (USD 690). This is also the fee you pay for renewing the Work Visa. You must pay the fee via a debit/credit card, when you complete the online application on the UDI website.

Remember: If you apply through a Visa Application Center rather than an Embassy, there is an extra service fee.

Duration of Norway Work Visa

A Norway Work Visa (i.e. Residence Permit for Work) is valid for two years. You can apply to renew it before it expires, for another two years. Then, after three years of continuous residence in Norway, you can apply for a Permanent Residence Permit, which has an indefinite duration.

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How to Renew a Norway Work Visa?

To renew your Norwegian Work Visa, you have to make an Online Application with the Directorate of Immigration (UDI). Then, you book an appointment with the Norwegian police and submit the documents. You must also pay an application fee.

Remember, you have to submit the documents at least one month before your visa expires, and there is usually a waiting time for the appointment. So, make sure you start the application about three months before.

Required Documents for Norway Work Visa Renewal

The documents you will need to submit when you apply for renewal of your Residence Permit for Work in Norway include:

  • Your passport, along with copies of all the used pages of the passport.
  • The Cover Letter, which you receive on your email after completing the online application on the UDI website.
  • The Offer of Employment form, downloadable from the UDI website.
  • Proof of your last three wages
  • Any additional documents that the UDI requires you to submit.

Health Insurance for International Workers in Norway

Once you get a Residence Permit for Work, move to Norway, and register as a resident, you will also become entitled to the Norwegian national healthcare system. This means that you will be assigned a general practitioner (known as a fastlege in Norwegian), who you should consult with for any medical concerns.

Norway’s healthcare system is paid by the government and funded by taxpayer money. However, anyone over the age of 16 has to pay for doctor’s visits and treatment up to about $260/per year. For any sort of treatment exceeding this amount, you receive an exemption card and will receive free treatment for the rest of the year. This ensures that if you are severely ill, then you will not have major medical bills to pay.

If you want to have additional coverage, such as treatment in private hospitals, coverage in case you need to be evacuated, or coverage if you travel back home for any reason, then you can also subscribe to an international health insurance plan.

Can I Have Dependents With a Norway Work Visa?

Yes, if you get a Norway Work Visa, you can apply to bring your dependent family members with you. This is called a Norway Family Visa. These family members can apply for a visa to join you in Norway:

  • Your spouse or registered partner
  • Your cohabitant. You must both be over the age of 24, and either be expecting a child together, or you have lived together for at least two years.
  • Your children under the age of 18.
  • Your children over the age of 18 if they meet one of the following requirements:
    • They are between 18 and 21, they are unmarried and have had a previous residence permit in Norway.
    • If you support your child financially and they live with you. They must not be working or studying (i.e. have an “independent life”).
    • The child is dependent as a result of health problems.

To bring your dependent family members to Norway with you, you must earn at least NOK 264 264 annually pre-tax (appx. USD 29,000).

Other Types of Norway Work Visas

There are other types of work visas for Norway, depending on the nature of work you intend to engage in:

  • Norway Seasonal Work Visa. If you will work, short-time, in a job which can only be done in a specific time of the year, or if you will work as a substitute for a permanent employee. You must receive an employment offer and get confirmation from the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV) before applying.
  • Norway Job-Seeker Visa. This visa is for skilled workers who have completed their studies in Norway, which will allow them to stay in Norway without a job offer and look for work.
  • Vocational Training and Research Visa. This visa is issued to students who will undertake training during their higher education studies or self-funded researchers, who are not employed with a Norwegian employer.
  • Norway Working Holiday Visa. This type of visa is issued to young adults (under 31 years) from Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, and New Zealand, which allows them to work and live in Norway for up to a year.
  • Work Visa for Artists. This is a short-term visa for artists, performers, or musicians, who will have concerts or performances in Norway. Maximum allowed stay of 14 days.

Norway Visa for Family Reunification

Categories of people who can apply for the Family reunification visa in Norway, the required documents, the application process and FAQs

In this article

You can apply for a Norway Family Reunification Visa if you want to join a close family member who is living in Norway.

Who Can Apply for a Norway Family Reunification Visa?

If you are the spouse, registered partner, cohabitation partner, or the child of a Norwegian citizen or resident, you can apply for a Family Reunification Visa. There are different criteria and requirements depending on the type of visa that the person you wish to join has.

Your family member who lives in Norway must make NOK 264,264 per year, pre-tax (approximately USD 28,800) and have a suitable place to live in order to be eligible to bring you to join them.

Family Reunification for Norway Work Visa Holders

Work Visa holders in Norway can bring the following family members to Norway with them:

  • Spouse or registered partner
    • The marriage must be valid
    • Both partners must be in the marriage willingly
    • You must be planning to live together in Norway
    • The marriage must not be a marriage of convenience
    • You must both be over the age of 24
  • Cohabitating partner
    • You must live together in Norway
    • Neither of you can be married to someone else
    • You must have lived together for at least two years OR you must have or be expecting a child together
  • Children under the age of 18. (Including adopted or foster children)
  • Dependent children over 18. You must be unmarried, and meet one of the following requirements:
    • You must be between 18 and 21 years of age and have held a Norway residence permit for several years in the past.
    • Your parents support you, and you are not employed nor pursuing studies independent of your family.
    • You are dependent on your family on the basis of a health condition.
  • Parent (only for visits up to 9 months).
    • You must prove you intend to return home after the visit.
    • You must not have visited your child in Norway in the past year, using this type of visa.
  • Minor siblings.
    • You must be full siblings
    • You must be under the age of 18.
    • There must not be anyone else in your country who can take care of you instead.

Family Reunification for International Students in Norway

To join your family member who is an international student in Norway you must be their:

  • Spouse or registered partner
    • The marriage must be valid
    • Both partners must be in the marriage willingly
    • You must be planning to live together in Norway
    • The marriage must not be a marriage of convenience
    • You must both be over the age of 24
  • Cohabitation partner
    • You must live together in Norway
    • Neither of you can be married to someone else
    • You must have lived together for at least two years OR you must have or be expecting a child together
  • Child under the age of 18 – including adopted children.

Family Reunification with Norwegian Citizens

If you are outside the EU/EEA and you want to go to Norway to join your family member who is a Norwegian citizen, you will have to start the application online, on the UDI website, and then submit the required documents at the nearest Norwegian Embassy or Visa Application Center.

To bring you to Norway, your family member must:

  • Make NOK 264,264 per year, pre-tax (approximately USD 28,800)
  • Have made the same amount last year
  • Not have received any financial assistance from NAV (økonomisk sosialhjelp) during the last 12 months.
  • Be able to prove the legitimacy of your relationship.

Norway Family Reunification Visa Requirements

The documents you need when you apply for a Norway Family Reunification Visa are:

  • Your passport. Also, bring copies of the used pages of your passport.
  • The Application Form. You can download this after you apply online on the Directorate of Immigration website (UDI).
  • Two passport-size photographs. They must be recent and have a white background.
  • Your birth certificate.
  • Proof of family relationship:
    • Household registration documents
    • Marriage certificate
    • If one of the spouses was married before: Divorce documents or death certificate
  • If your family member works in Norway:
    • Their work contract, stating the duration of employment.
    • The three most recent payslips.
    • The most recent tax notice.
    • A written declaration that they have not received social benefits in the last 12 months.
  • If your family member is a student in Norway:
    • Proof of their enrollment in the university.
    • Proof they have enough income to support you and themselves.
    • Evidence of any loans or grants they have received for their studies.
  • If your family member is self-employed in Norway:
    • Proof of their company registration.
    • Proof of their monthly income.
    • Their most recent tax settlement notice.
    • A written declaration that they have not received social benefits in the last 12 months.
  • The printed checklist of documents. You see this on the UDI page.
  • Any additional documents, that the Norwegian authorities require, depending on your specific circumstances.

Document guidelines:

  • Bring the originals and copies for each of the documents
  • All the documents must be in English or Norwegian. If they are not, translate them (via a registered translator) and attach them along with the original document.
  • Any civil documents, such as marriage or birth certificates have to be legalized by an Apostille.
  • If you are unable to submit a certain document, enclose a written explanation as to why.

When to Apply for a Family Reunification Visa for Norway?

You can apply for a Family Visa at the same time your family member applies for their own Norway Visa for work, studies, etc. You will receive the decision at the same time, and you can travel to Norway together. However, you can also apply for after your family member has gone to Norway.

How to Apply for a Family Reunification Visa for Norway?

The application process for a Family Reunification Visa is:

  1. Gather the required documents for a Family Reunification Visa
  2. Register an account and complete the online application on the Directorate of Immigration (UDI) website.
  3. If you apply yourself, from your come country:
    • Make an appointment with the nearest Norwegian Embassy or Visa Application Center to hand in the documents.
    • The Embassy/VAC sends the documents to the UDI.
  4. If your family member handles the application on your behalf:
    • You send them the documents.
    • They submit the completed application on the local police service for residence permits and protection or the service centres for foreign workers, depending on where they live.
  5. Wait for the UDI to process your application.
  6. If the outcome is positive, make an appointment with the police services in the area where you will live in Norway so you can register as a resident and receive your Residence Card.
    • You make the appointment via the UDI website.
    • Make sure the appointment is within the first week of your intended date of arrival.
  7. If you need an entry visa for Norway, the Norwegian Embassy will issue one.
  8. Travel and join your family member in Norway.

Note: If you will join a spouse, you will likely have to enter an interview, during which the visa officers of the Norwegian Embassy will ask you questions regarding your relationship. They will try to determine whether the relationship is legitimate, by asking questions such as how and where you met, about your wedding, each others’ family members etc.

Can I Work With a Norway Family Visa?

Yes, if you will join your spouse, who has a Work Visa, the Norwegian Family Visa allows you to work in Norway as well.

What Is the Duration of a Norway Family Reunification Visa?

Your visa will be issued in concurrence with the visa of your family member, between one and three years. The Norwegian Directorate of Immigration will decide on the duration of the visa. This type of visa can be renewed and even lead to a Permanent Residence Permit.

Can I Renew My Norway Family Reunification Visa?

Yes, you can renew a Norwegian Family Visa. You must apply for renewal at least one month before the expiration date, at the local police station. Before applying at the station, you have to start the online application on the UDI website (similar to when you initially applied) and make an appointment to deliver the documents.

Because it may take a while to get an appointment, make sure you give yourself enough time – apply more than one month in advance.

Can I Get Married in Norway?

As long as you have “legal stay” in Norway, you can get married there even if neither you nor your fiance are Norwegian citizens. Legal stay means that you are there either on a Schengen Visa, a Work Visa, or another type of Norwegian Residence Permit, or you are allowed to enter the country visa-free.

The process of getting married in Norway if both of you fall into either one of the categories below is very straightforward  – the same as it if for two Norwegian citizens getting married:

  • Permanent resident
  • On refugee status as an asylum seeker
  • An EEA citizen with permanent residence in Norway
  • A Norwegian citizen

But if you will marry a Norwegian citizen or permanent resident, but you do not fall into either of the aforementioned categories, then you must apply for a certificate from the Norwegian Tax Administration.

Note: For citizens of certain countries, it can be difficult to get a Norway Visa simply to get married. That’s because the Norwegian authorities may doubt your intentions to return home should you not get married as you planned.

If you usually require a visa to enter Norway, even as a visitor, then you may face difficulties in your Marriage Visa application. In this case, the best outcome would be to get married first, and then apply for a Norwegian Family Reunification Visa.

Do I Have Health Insurance in Norway With a Family Visa?

Yes, if you get a Family Visa (Residence Permit for Family Reunification), then you are entitled to healthcare in Norway. You will be assigned a fastlege (which is like a family doctor or general practitioner), whom you have to consult for any medical concerns.

You only have to pay for medical treatment up to about $260 per year (like a deductible). Once you have received medical treatment up to this amount, you get an exemption card and have free healthcare for the remainder of the year.

If you are under the age of 16 or a nursing woman, you receive the exemption card right away – meaning you have entirely free healthcare.

You can also get an international health insurance plan, which gives you additional coverage if you want treatment in private hospitals or abroad or if you want coverage for medical evacuation.

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